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Illuminate Your Landscape: A Guide to Outdoor Lighting with Native Edge

by Heather Day / November 22, 2023

Quality Fixtures: We prioritize durable and high-quality lighting fixtures that withstand the elements. Our selection includes a range of styles to suit different tastes and functions, ensuring that the fixtures seamlessly integrate with the overall landscape design.
Quality Fixtures: We prioritize durable and high-quality lighting fixtures that withstand the elements. Our selection includes a range of styles to suit different tastes and functions, ensuring that the fixtures seamlessly integrate with the overall landscape design.

As the sun sets and darkness descends, your outdoor space transforms into a canvas of potential. Enter the world of landscape lighting, where artistry meets functionality, and your yard takes on a new life after dusk. At Native Edge, we believe in the power of well-designed landscape lighting to enhance both the aesthetic appeal and practicality of your outdoor haven.

Highlighting Architectural Features: Showcase the architectural elements of your home and other structures in the landscape. The interplay of contrast can bring out a unique character in your property that can only be witnessed after dark.
Highlighting Architectural Features: Showcase the architectural elements of your home and other structures in the landscape. The interplay of contrast can bring out a unique character in your property that can only be witnessed after dark.
Highlighting Architectural Features: Showcase the architectural elements of your home and other structures in the landscape. The interplay of contrast can bring out a unique character in your property that can only be witnessed after dark.

The Art of Illumination

Landscape lighting is more than just a practical necessity; it's an art that allows you to showcase the beauty of your outdoor environment. Our approach involves carefully crafting a light design that accentuates key features of your landscape and architecture, creating a mesmerizing play of shadow and light. Whether it's a majestic tree, a winding pathway, or a water feature, strategic lighting adds a touch of drama and elegance to your surroundings.

Extended Enjoyment: With thoughtfully placed lighting, your outdoor space becomes an extension of your living area. Enjoy alfresco dinners, entertain guests, or simply unwind in the soothing ambiance of the evening.
Energy-Efficient Options: Embrace eco-friendly lighting solutions with energy-efficient LED fixtures. These not only reduce your energy footprint but also contribute to long-term cost savings.
Extended Enjoyment: With thoughtfully placed lighting, your outdoor space becomes an extension of your living area. Enjoy alfresco dinners, entertain guests, or simply unwind in the soothing ambiance of the evening.

Benefits Beyond Beauty

  • Enhanced Safety: Illuminate pathways, steps, cacti, and potential hazards to ensure a safe and secure outdoor environment. Well-light spaces discourage unwanted nocturnal visitors and provide a sense of security for your family and guests.
  • Extended Enjoyment: With thoughtfully placed lighting, your outdoor space becomes an extension of your living area. Enjoy alfresco dinners, entertain guests, or simply unwind in the soothing ambiance of the evening.
  • Highlighting Architectural Features: Showcase the architectural elements of your home and other structures in the landscape. The interplay of contrast can bring out a unique character in your property that can only be witnessed after dark.
  • Increased Property Value: A well-lit landscape not only enhances your quality of life, but also the quality of your property. Prospective buyers are often drawn to homes with professionally designed outdoor lighting.
  • Energy-Efficient Options: Embrace eco-friendly lighting solutions with energy-efficient LED fixtures. These not only reduce your energy footprint but also contribute to long-term cost savings.
Increased Property Value: A well-lit landscape not only enhances your quality of life, but also the quality of your property. Prospective buyers are often drawn to homes with professionally designed outdoor lighting.
Enhanced Safety: Illuminate pathways, steps, cacti, and potential hazards to ensure a safe and secure outdoor environment. Well-light spaces discourage unwanted nocturnal visitors and provide a sense of security for your family and guests.

Bright Ideas with Native Edge

At Native Edge, we tailor our lighting designs to match the unique characteristics of your landscape, and take a customized approach to the implementation of those designs.

  • Custom Designs: We understand that each landscape is distinctive. Our team works closely with you to create a custom lighting design that compliments your aesthetic preferences and highlights the individual features of your outdoor space.
  • Quality Fixtures: We prioritize durable and high-quality lighting fixtures that withstand the elements. Our selection includes a range of styles to suit different tastes and functions, ensuring that the fixtures seamlessly integrate with the overall landscape design.
  • Professional Installation: Our skilled team ensures precise installation, taking into account factors such as beam angles, color temperatures, and optimal placement. Professional installation not only enhances the aesthetic appeal, but also ensures the longevity of the lighting system.
  • Smart Lighting Control: Experience convenient control with smart lighting solutions with effortless and intuitive controls.
Extended Enjoyment: With thoughtfully placed lighting, your outdoor space becomes an extension of your living area. Enjoy alfresco dinners, entertain guests, or simply unwind in the soothing ambiance of the evening.
Extended Enjoyment: With thoughtfully placed lighting, your outdoor space becomes an extension of your living area. Enjoy alfresco dinners, entertain guests, or simply unwind in the soothing ambiance of the evening.
Increased Property Value: A well-lit landscape not only enhances your quality of life, but also the quality of your property. Prospective buyers are often drawn to homes with professionally designed outdoor lighting.
Increased Property Value: A well-lit landscape not only enhances your quality of life, but also the quality of your property. Prospective buyers are often drawn to homes with professionally designed outdoor lighting.

Let Your Landscape Shine

Beyond the functional aspects, landscape lighting is an investment in the beauty, safety, and overall value of your property. Illuminate the night with Native Edge, where responsible landscapes meet captivating designs, creating an enchanting outdoor experience.

Ready to bring your landscape to life after dark? Contact us today for a consultation, and let's embark on a journey to elevate your outdoor space and truly make it shine.

Quality Fixtures: We prioritize durable and high-quality lighting fixtures that withstand the elements. Our selection includes a range of styles to suit different tastes and functions, ensuring that the fixtures seamlessly integrate with the overall landscape design.
Custom Designs: We understand that each landscape is distinctive.  Our team works closely with you to create a custom lighting design that compliments your aesthetic preferences and highlights the individual features of your outdoor space.
Highlighting Architectural Features: Showcase the architectural elements of your home and other structures in the landscape. The interplay of contrast can bring out a unique character in your property that can only be witnessed after dark.

November Garden Guide from Native Edge

by Heather Day / November 1, 2023

November Gardening Checklist from Native Edge

November: the Full Garden List

As we move deeper into autumn in Central Texas, we are finally beginning to feel some colder weather. Frost will be turning into an issue for sensitive plants. It’s time to move your home and garden toward winter, and prepare for the colder months ahead.

Planting, Transplanting, & Care

Ornamental

  • Plant perennials, shrubs, ornamental clumping grasses
  • Trees: It's an ideal time to plant fruiting and ornamental trees, including cold-tolerant citrus such as Satsuma mandarins, kumquat, and tangerines.
    • Plant outdoor citrus trees in full sunlight with very well-draining soil. Place where it will be protected from gusty northern winds. If you have a sunny south-facing brick or rock wall, consider espalier. Lemons are the perfect candidate for espalier.
    • Most deciduous trees are dormant or going dormant by now. This dormancy makes them much more tolerant of temperature and water. Plant them now until early February to take advantage of this.
  • Plant Winter Annuals, including Calendula, Snapdragon, Pansy, Viola, Dusty Miller, Flowering and Ornamental Kale & Cabbage, Alyssum, Stock, Cyclamen
  • Early to Thanksgiving, plant native wildflower seeds like Bluebonnets, Phlox, Mexican Hat, Indian Paintbrush, and Indian Blanket. Also non-native Poppies, Larkspurs, and Hollyhocks.
  • Plant Spring Bulbs to the first week of December.
  • Force paperwhite bulbs for holiday blooms.
  • Avoid planting cold-tender plants like Pride of Barbados, Esperanza, Lantana, and Plumbago.
  • Succulents: bring frost-tender succulents indoors. Many succulents such as Echeveria bloom during the winter. Keep taking care of them as usual, being careful to not overwater as the cold temperatures keep soil wetter longer. Remove dead leaves to not contribute to rot.
  • Roses: Grafted roses are not as cold-tolerant as own-root roses and need to be protected from a hard frost. Mound up straw or soil around the root zone as insulation. Keep your roses watered during the winter if there are no sufficient rains.
  • Evergreens: All evergreen plants still lose water through their leaves during the wither. Continue to water them through the winter if there is not sufficient rain.
  • Ornamental Grasses: You can largely leave your ornamental grasses alone until early spring. If native grasses are looking a little drab, glove up and give them a fluffing with open hands, going in an upward motion to remove dead leaves. This is especially effective for Muhly grasses.
  • Transplanting: Strawberries can be transplanted into moist soil. Cool-season annuals can be added to containers if protected from frost. Keep adding bulbs and tuck a few into containers that will winter outdoors. This is the last month to transplant container-grown roses. Add hardy vines and ground covers so they have the winter to develop an extensive root system for the summer season.
  • Mulch cold-tender plants like gingers, Esperanza, and semi-tropicals.

Herbs

  • Plant Perennial Thyme, Oregano, Lavender
  • Plant Arugula, Cilantro transplants, Parsley, Dill, Fennel, Chervil, Summer Savory, Borage, Chives, Rue
  • Be prepared to cover herbs in case of a deep freeze.

Food Crops

  • Plant Asian Greens, Beets, Carrots, Swiss Chard (seed or transplants), Collards (seed or transplants), Fava Beans, Garlic, Kale (seed or transplants), Kohlrabi (seed or transplants), Lettuce (seed or transplants), Mustard (seed or transplants), Onion (bulbing, seeds), Radish, Shallots, Spinach (seed or transplants), Turnips
  • Pay attention to the weather. Before the first frost, pick the fruit from tender plants such as tomatoes, peppers, and cucumbers. For frosts and extended periods of cold weather, consider using row cover tunnels using frost cloth and hoops. Remove the fabric when temperatures get above 45 degrees to keep from baking your plants.
  • Remove and compost asparagus tops. Save seeds from heirloom varieties to enlarge your vegetable patch.
  • Our average first frost is November 15, but sometimes occurs earlier. Many root vegetables such as turnips, carrots, and parsnips sweeten after a frost or two. Parsnips need this cold treatment for the best flavor and can stay in the ground for a month after frosts start.
  • Keep planting winter crops in small batches for successive harvest.
  • Water weekly with liquid seaweed for strong root establishment.

Pruning

  • Avoid pruning shrubs right now unless you see damage or extensive runners.
  • It's okay to prune Red Oak and Live Oak through January.
  • It's okay to prune trees to prepare for possible winter freezes.
  • Thyme
  • Prune the dead wood of herbaceous perennials such as lantana and beautyberry after the first couple of freezes.

Soil Care

  • Check mulch and replenish as necessary.
  • Stockpile leaves for mulch and composting all year.
  • Prepare veggie beds that won't be planted with a mulch of leaves and compost to cover soil completely.
  • Take advantage of good weather to build up soil in other beds so they're ready for winter planting.

Fertilizing

  • Only cool-season vegetables should be fertilized, as needed, with a moderate application of a 3-1-2 or 4-1-2 ratio fertilizer.

Dividing/Moving

  • Shrubs, roses, trees, evergreen spring-blooming perennials

Lawn Care

  • There is not much to do with your lawn once November and cold temperatures hit. The grass generally goes dormant and you needn't mow. If you must mow, keep high to shade out germinating weeds.
  • Use a mulching mower instead of raking leaves.
  • You also will not need to fertilize or use pre-emergents as they would stimulate new growth that could freeze off. You can amend lightly with compost to add a bit of insulation and decompose very slowly over the winter.
  • Continue to water depending on rainfall. More grass dies from dehydration than from cold in winter. Water before you expect a frost to protect roots in the cold.
  • As you will not be watering that often, now is a good time to inspect your sprinkler system. Replace any damaged heads.

Watering

  • Water everything well before a freeze, but avoid overwatering. Irrigate only in the absence of rainfalls and test for dryness before going for the hose.

Pests & Wildlife

  • Many birds are migrating during this time. Consider putting out a bird feeder with sunflower seeds, millet, dried fruit, and suet to feed local songbirds. Keep bird feeders away from death zones like tall grasses or bushes, ledges, or wall corners to keep our feathered friends from outdoor cats. The higher the better.
  • Insects are not much of a problem after the first frost hits. Take advantage of outside time with no mosquitoes.

Indoor Plants

  • Hose off plants to remove any unwanted pests before you bring them into the house. Wipe off any spiderwebs.
  • Acclimate your plants by at first bringing them in only at night, so they get used to the decreased light and humidity. This can help prevent leaf drop. Gradually increase the time indoors until they are inside all of the time for the season.
  • Place tropicals and other houseplants in a sunny southern window or greenhouse.
  • Decrease the amount of water your plants receive while they are inside. Make sure you put a drip tray down to protect your flooring. Water only when the soil is dry and be careful not to flood the drip tray.
  • Refrain from fertilizing, but depending on the plant, use a small quantity of slow-release fertilizer or a half-strength liquid fertilizer.
  • Diseases/Pests: Pest insects are more likely to be encountered on indoor plants than disease because the interior environment rarely offers favorable conditions for foliar diseases to develop. However, when plants are grown under stressful indoor conditions (such as lower light, lower humidity, and excess water) soil-borne pathogens often develop.

Other Tasks & Prep

  • In the Kitchen
    • Cut basil to freeze in oil in ice cube trays for winter recipes.
    • Allow tomatoes to ripen indoors in a sealed paper bag, or make fried green tomatoes
  • In the Shed
    • Clean your gardening tools.
    • Sharpen blades of shovels, trimmers, and loppers.
    • Apply a thin coat of machine oil to lubricate moving parts and prevent rust, especially on pruning sheers.
    • Use diluted bleach to disinfect trimmers to prevent spread of diseases.
    • Treat wooden handles with linseed oil.
  • In the Yard
    • Select spots where you want fruit trees, grapes, or berries to plant in January; for now, prep with compost.
    • Rake leaves into beds to mulch over winter and return nutrients to the soil. Use excess leaves in compost.
    • November usually means storms for Central Texas, so periodically keep your garden beds clean by picking up downed branches and debris.
    • Prepare for the freezes by insulating faucets and draining garden hoses.
    • Check gutters for debris so they may do their job properly in the rainy season.
    • Consult your owner's manuals for information on winterizing your lawnmower and other engine-powered equipment.
  • In the Greenhouse
    • Collect seeds from summer annuals to dry and store indoors until next spring.
    • Take cuttings of tender annuals to propagate in warmth for planting next spring.
    • Keep new seedlings moist but not drenched.

Contact us today and have your yard ready for Spring!

Let Native Edge help you carve out your perfect garden space.

October Garden Guide from Native Edge

by Heather Day / October 1, 2023

October: the full garden list

Plant: ornamental & wildlife

  • Perennials, shrubs, ornamental (clumping) grasses
  • Cover crops for dormant vegetable beds
    • Annual Rye
    • Austrian Winter Peas
    • Clover
    • Elon (Cereal) Rye
    • Hairy Vetch
  • Late: Holloyhocks
  • Larkspurs
  • Native Wildflower Seeds
    • Bluebonnets
    • Indian Blanket (Gaillardia)
    • Indian Paintbrush
    • Mexican Hat
    • Phlox
  • Non-Native Poppies

Plant: herbs

  • Borage
  • Chervil
  • Cilantro, seeds or transplants
  • Dill
  • Fennel
  • Lavender
  • Oregano
  • Parsley
  • Perennials thyme
  • Summer savory

Plant: food crops

  • Artichoke (transplants)
  • Arugula, late month
  • Beets
  • Bok Choy
  • Brussel Sprouts (transplants)
  • Cabbage (transplants)
  • Carrots
  • Cauliflower (transplants)
  • Chard, Swiss (seeds or transplants)
  • Collards (seeds or transplants)
  • Fava Beans
  • Garlic Softneck varieties of garlic do the best in our region
  • Greens, cool season
  • Kale (seeds or transplants)
  • Kohlrabi (seeds or transplants)
  • Leeks (seeds)
  • Lettuce (seeds or transplants)
  • Mustard (seeds or transplants)
  • Radish
  • Shallots
  • Spinach (seeds or transplants)
  • Turnip

Prune

  • Oak trees safe to prune

Divide/Move

  • Daylily
  • Fern
  • Iris
  • Liriope
  • Spring-Blooming Perennials
  • Violets

Prep

  • Add compost to vegetable gardens along with organic fertilizer if not already done
  • Plan wildflower seeds and bulbs to plant in November
  • Mulch tropical and semi-cold-hardy plants like gingers, Esperanza, Pride of Barbados, Firecracker fern, and bananas
  • Take cuttings of tender annuals to propagate in warmth to renew your garden next spring
  • If temps dip, cut basil and preserve in oil in the freezer
  • Collect seeds of annuals to dry and store inside until next Spring

Lawn

  • Fertilize with an organic slow release formula like 8-2-4 or similar ratio. Avoid products with too much nitrogen. This is the best time of year to fertilize.
  • Brown patch: Apply a quarter inch of compost. Apply corn meal. Find out what’s causing the problem like low drainage spots or compacted areas.
  • Mow high to fend off weed seeds that are germinating. Taller grass shades them out.

Pests

  • Caterpillars become active again. Monitor plants for holes and droppings. Control by picking them off or spraying with Bacillus thuringiensis (Bt)

Other tasks

  • Late month: get row cover or plan other protection in case of early frost in November
  • Cut basil to freeze in oil in ice cube trays to use this winter in soups and stews
  • Collect seeds from summer annuals to dry and store indoors until next spring
  • Get houseplants ready to move inside. Investigate for any “buddies” that could be coming indoors with them.
  • Dig and store Caladium bulbs when foliage dies.

Contact us today and have your yard ready for Spring!

Let Native Edge help you carve out your perfect garden space.

Hyde Park Hideaway

by Rachel Phipps / September 13, 2023

This adorable Hyde Park bungalow needed a bit of curb appeal as well as a courtyard refresh.

The old driveway was replaced, allowing more versatility in the space, being replaced with washed granite gravel. A sleek combination of mulched beds contrasted against washed granite gravel elevates the space to a more contemporary feel, while still maintaining the charm of the house and neighborhood. Limestone flagstone paths walk you through the courtyard space, beckoning you to the backyard. On your way there, you’ll enjoy a selection of native and adapted plants and grasses that will acclimate to the space beautifully, establishing enjoyment for the family for years to come.

Plant List: Possumhaw Holly, Compact Cherry Laurel, Oakleaf Hydrangea, Dwarf Palmetto, Turk's Cap 'Big Momma', Inland Sea Oats, Pale-Leaf Yucca, Lawn Sedge, Heartleaf Skullcap, Everillo Sedge, Crossvine

Hardscape List: Washed Granite Gravel, Texas Native Hardwood Mulch, Limestone Flagstone

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Worksite Wednesday: Mulching for Water Conservation

by Heather Day / August 23, 2023

Welcome to Worksite Wednesday, where we walk through the particulars of a project or project feature! Today, we are back at Meadow Modern discussing how mulch aids in plant health and water conservation. We’re also looking at the importance of using local materials whenever possible to conserve transportation resources.#NativeEdge #NativeEdgeLandscape #landscapedesign #waterconservation #austindrought #mulch #mulching #lawncare #xeriscape #xeriscapingRoyalty Free Music: https://www.bensound.com License code: WAUQFQJBG33Q5W13

Lawns to Prairies and Meadows: A Path to Water Conservation, Biodiversity, and Savings

by Heather Day / August 18, 2023

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=fm96DnrluTQ

In our pursuit of verdant landscapes, it's time to reconsider the traditional American lawn. The history of lawns, harkening back to European aristocrats of the 17th and 18th centuries, has given rise to expansive turf grass-covered spaces across the United States. But beneath the well-manicured surface lies a staggering environmental and economic cost. Enter the concept of converting these sprawling lawns into thriving meadows – a transformative shift that not only benefits your wallet but also the environment. In this piece, we delve into the journey from lawn to meadow, exploring the ecological advantages and aesthetic appeal that this transition brings, and how Native Edge Landscape can guide you through this exciting transformation.

A Glimpse into History

The American love affair with lawns was initially inspired by European elites who showcased their affluence by cultivating vast expanses of greenery. Today, the United States boasts lawns covering a mind-boggling 63,000 square miles – nearly the size of Texas. These lawns, dominated by non-native turf grass species, consume copious amounts of water, fertilizers, pesticides, and labor, creating an ecological imbalance.

Meadows, Prairies, and Grasslands: A Paradigm Shift

Converting portions of lawns into ecologically sound alternatives holds immense promise and offer a holistic solution to the environmental and economic challenges posed by traditional lawns.

The Marvels of Meadows

Water Absorption

Meadows outperform lawns in stormwater absorption. Unlike compacted lawn soils prone to runoff, meadows boast looser soil and extensive root systems, enabling effective rainwater infiltration. This natural process recharges groundwater and supports stream flow during dry spells.

Pollution Control

Meadows act as nature's water filter, intercepting pollutants that elude turf lawns. A buffer of native vegetation along streams proves more effective in preventing pollutants and sediment from entering water bodies compared to turf.

Reduced Irrigation Dependency

While lawns in arid climates guzzle water, meadows thrive without excessive irrigation. The native species in meadows are adapted to regional climates, reducing the need for synthetic irrigation.

Flourishing Wildlife Habitat

Meadows promote biodiversity by fostering a diverse array of plant species. This diversity invites insects, invertebrates, and subsequently, birds along the food chain. Avian species that often evade lawns find sanctuary in meadows, contributing to healthier ecosystems.

Pollinator Paradise

Meadows offer a safe haven for pollinators like bees and butterflies. These essential creatures aid in the pollination of crops and flowering plants, which sustains human food production and ecological balance.

Cost Savings and Efficiency

Meadows require significantly less maintenance compared to constant lawn mowing. The cost of labor, gasoline, and equipment needed for lawn maintenance can be curtailed, benefiting municipalities and individuals alike.

A Multi-Sensory Experience

Meadows provide a full sensory experience. The bustling ecosystem enchants with fluttering butterflies, songbirds, and the sway of wildflowers. The aesthetic appeal extends through the seasons, even during winter and the blazing Texas summer, when dried grasses add texture and beauty.

Native Edge Landscape: Your Partner in Transformation

As advocates of sustainable landscaping, Native Edge Landscape is your guiding light in transitioning from lawns to meadows. Our expertise in native plants, ecological balance, and responsible landscaping equips us to help you create areas that are not only aesthetically pleasing but also ecologically vital. Let us transform your outdoor space into a haven for biodiversity, water conservation, and cost savings.

The journey from lawn to a more diverse space is a transformative leap towards environmental stewardship and financial prudence. Native Edge Landscape stands by your side, turning expanses of non-native turf into vibrant swathes of sustainability. As we redefine our outdoor homes, we strive to make them a true testament to the harmonious coexistence of nature and human habitation.

Nurturing Nature Responsibly: Water Conservation Through Better Design

by Heather Day / August 5, 2023

Water conservation is a critical mission for our planet's sustainable future, and Native Edge Landscape has always been at the forefront of this eco-conscious movement. With our vision of responsible landscapes, we employ innovative techniques like xeriscaping, hardscaping, and water-wise plant selection to make a lasting impact on water conservation. Envision what your space could be while we explore our role in creating environmentally responsible landscapes.

Xeriscaping: A Texas-Friendly Landscape Approach

Xeriscaping is a landscape design philosophy that embraces water-efficient practices, reducing water usage without sacrificing beauty and functionality. Here's how Native Edge incorporates the principles of xeriscaping:

  • Drought-Tolerant Plants: Xeriscaping involves using native and drought-tolerant plants that thrive in the local climate with minimal water needs. These resilient species retain water more effectively, reducing irrigation demands significantly.
  • Soil Improvement: By enhancing the soil's ability to retain moisture, xeriscaping ensures that plants make the most of the water they receive.
  • Mulching: Mulching around plants reduces evaporation, keeps the soil cooler, and minimizes weed growth, further conserving water.
  • Grouping Plants by Water Needs: Strategic plant grouping based on water requirements helps ensure efficient irrigation practices.

Hardscape: Striking a Balance

Hardscape elements, such as patios, walkways, and retaining walls, are integral to any landscape. However, too much of the wrong kinds of hardscape can hinder water absorption and contribute to irresponsible runoff. Native Edge tackles this challenge by finding the right balance between hardscape and green space:

  • Permeable Materials: Using permeable materials and aggregates allows for rainwater to seep into the ground, preventing runoff and replenishing the water table.
  • Efficient Contouring and Drainage: Strategic contouring of hardscape elements, combined with efficient drainage solutions, directs rainwater to areas where it can be absorbed or reused effectively. This prevents wasteful runoff and improves water retention in the soil, promoting healthier landscapes.
  • Beauty and Functionality in Harmony: At Native Edge, we never compromise on aesthetics or functionality. Our hardscape designs seamlessly blend with the landscape, delivering visual appeal while conserving water.
  • Local. Sustainable.: We love to use local hardscape materials wherever we can, employing the aesthetic of our Texas landscape and reducing the environmental strain of transportation. Local mulch, Texas cedar, Brazos River rock, hill country limestone. We also employ materials excavated from your site wherever we can, including our local impressive limestone boulders.

Water-Wise Plant Selection: Flourishing Sustainably

Native Edge Landscape understands that striking landscapes can still be achieved without excessive water consumption. Our approach includes:

  • Native Plants: By incorporating native plants, we ensure the landscape is in harmony with the local ecosystem, reducing the need for additional watering and promoting biodiversity.
  • Drought-Tolerant Species: Carefully selecting drought-tolerant plants promises a vibrant, resilient landscape that thrives even in dry spells.
  • Smart Irrigation: Using advanced irrigation systems, Native Edge can help you deliver the right amount of water at the right time, minimizing waste while optimizing plant health.

Water Conservation is a collective responsibility, and we here at Native Edge lead by example, spearheading eco-friendly practices that prioritize xeriscaping, responsible hardscape, and water-wise plant selection. By embracing these principles, we can create stunning landscapes that prosper without straining precious water resources. Join us as we promote sustainability and choose to nurture nature responsibly, creating a greener world for generations to come. Together, we can ensure a thriving future for both our landscapes and our planet.

Pergola Perfection: A Journey through History and Versatile Design Options

by Heather Day / July 22, 2023

When it comes to creating enchanting outdoor spaces that blend beauty and functionality, few architectural features rival the allure of a pergola. These elegant structures have graced gardens and landscapes for centuries, evolving in style and material options to suit diverse preferences and purposes. By now, you’ve seen our most recent project, Steel & Cedar, in which we highlight a charming pergola perfect for the Texas backyard landscape. In this blog, we embark on a captivating journey through the history of pergola design, exploring its enduring charm and the myriad of style options and materials available today. At Native Edge, we believe that a well-crafted pergola can transform any outdoor area into a sanctuary of relaxation, while embodying the principles of sustainable and environmentally responsible landscape design.

Heavy cedar timbers are joined with exposed hardware to form the structure of this pergola, topped with corrugated metal roofing that protects this gorgeous outdoor kitchen space from the elements. The back wall of a pergola cleverly houses spacious storage concealed behind sliding barn doors.

The Roots of Pergolas: A Historical Overview

The origins of pergolas can be traced back to ancient civilizations, from ancient Egypt to Rome. Initially serving as shaded walkways or passageways, these structures provided respite from the scorching sun and often supported climbing plants, creating a natural canopy. As the concept spread throughout the Mediterranean, pergolas adorned Roman gardens, draped with vines and foliage.

Varieties of Pergola Styles

Classic Mediterranean Pergola

Inspired by the timeless charm of ancient Greece and Rome, the classic Mediterranean pergola exudes a sense of elegance and simplicity. With sturdy columns and clean lines, it becomes a captivating focal point in any landscape. Adorned with climbing plants like bougainvillea or wisteria, this style infuses vibrant colors and delightful scents into the surroundings.

Zen Pergola

Embracing the principles of Zen gardens, this style reflects simplicity and tranquility. Crafted with natural materials like bamboo and timber, the Zen pergola provides a meditative space, inviting a sense of calm and harmony to the garden.

Contemporary Pergola

Celebrating modern aesthetics, the contemporary pergola features sleek lines and innovative materials like metal and composite options. This style harmoniously complements contemporary architecture and design, adding a touch of sophistication to outdoor spaces.

Rustic Wooden Pergola

Radiating warmth and charm, the rustic wooden pergola celebrates the beauty of natural materials. Crafted from reclaimed wood or rugged timber, it adds authenticity to the landscape, seamlessly blending with the surrounding environment.

Partial Pergolas

Occasionally, only a bit of shade for seating or plantings is needed, or you're simply looking to highlight a particular area or feature in your space. A partial pergola may provide the perfect solution. Plant with vines and let even a small space become a dreamy focal point.

Materials for Pergolas: Exploring Sustainable Options

Cedar Wood

A popular choice, cedar wood combines elegance with sustainability. Sourced from responsibly managed forests, cedar is naturally resistant to decay and insects, making it a durable and eco-friendly option for pergola construction.

Bamboo

Renowned for its rapid growth and renewability, bamboo is an excellent eco-conscious choice for pergolas. Lightweight yet robust, it creates a Japanese Zen-inspired pergola with ease.

Metal

Materials like aluminum and steel offer contemporary pergola options. These metals are durable, weather-resistant, and can be recycled, making them a sustainable choice.

Recycled Materials

Embrace sustainability further by using recycled materials such as composite decking or salvaged wood. Integrating recycled elements reduces environmental impact while adding character to the space.

Throughout history, pergolas have stood as timeless symbols of elegance and beauty in outdoor design. From their ancient origins to contemporary interpretations, these open structures continue to captivate our imaginations and enhance the allure of outdoor spaces. At Native Edge, we believe that pergolas not only provide shade and architectural elegance but also exemplify our commitment to sustainable and environmentally responsible landscaping practices. Whether you seek a classic Mediterranean retreat or a Zen-inspired haven, our expert team can bring your pergola dreams to life, merging style and sustainability for a truly transformative outdoor experience. Let us craft a pergola that aligns with your vision, turning your garden into a sanctuary of relaxation and serenity, while embracing the principles of a sustainable future.

Maintaining Your Wildflower Prairie & Setting Yourself Up for Success

by Heather Day / June 3, 2023

In a blog post last month, we talked all about the benefits of planting native wildflowers in place of traditional lawns. Transforming your front lawn into a vibrant wildflower prairie can bring beauty, ecological benefits, and a love of native aesthetic to your landscape. However, maintaining a wildflower prairie yard requires a different approach compared to traditional lawn care. In this blog post, we'll explore some essential care and maintenance practices to help you nurture and sustain a thriving wildflower prairie.

Year One
Year Three: Here you see a diversification of species, and a fresh planting incorporating more native grasses.

Diversify with Native Grasses

While wildflowers are often the main focus when seeding a prairie yard, incorporating native grasses is equally important. Native grasses provide structure, enhance the overall aesthetic, and contribute to a more natural appearance. When choosing your seed mix, consider including a variety of native grasses that will complement the wildflowers. These grasses typically take longer to mature, so combining grass planting with wildflower seeding ensures a balanced timing of growth and a more visually appealing landscape.

Allow for Seed Production

A crucial aspect of wildflower management is allowing the plants to go to seed. This process ensures the self-sustainability of your prairie and encourages the natural dispersal of seeds for future growth. By letting the flowers fully mature and scatter their seeds, you're supporting the long-term success and expansion of your wildflower population.

Manage Aggressive Species & Combat Weeds

While diversity is key in a wildflower prairie, it's essential to manage more aggressive species within your seed mix. Some wildflowers might dominate the landscape, inhibiting the growth of other species. Regular observation and manual removal of these dominant plants prior to them going to seed can help maintain a balanced and harmonious mix of wildflowers.

Weeds can occasionally find their way into a wildflower prairie yard, competing with the desired plants for resources. Regular weeding is essential, particularly during the establishment phase of your prairie. Identifying and removing weeds promptly will minimize their impact on the overall health and appearance of your wildflower ecosystem.

Supplemental Watering

While wildflowers are generally resilient and adapted to native rainfall patterns, providing supplemental water during the early spring can give them a boost. This extra hydration helps them establish strong root systems and encourages more robust growth and blooming throughout the season. Aim for deep, infrequent watering rather than frequent shallow watering to promote healthier plant development.

Creating and maintaining a wildflower prairie yard requires a different approach to traditional lawn care. By diversifying with native grasses, allowing for seed production, managing aggressive species, combating weeds, and providing supplemental water during the early stages, you can ensure a thriving and sustainable wildflower prairie. Embracing these practices will not only enhance the beauty of your landscape but also contribute to the ecological well-being of your surroundings. Enjoy the natural splendor and the multitude of benefits that a wildflower prairie yard brings to your sustainable future.

Cherrywood Charmer

by Erin Spencer / May 5, 2023

The home owners of the Cherrywood Charmer were seeking an aesthetically pleasing, environmentally sensitive landscape that would complement the existing large custom deck, which is used both as a peaceful refuge and for some entertaining. This project involved a full-property landscape renovation as the landscaping around the home had been largely untouched for twenty years. It had been in a state of decline in recent years, accelerated by the recent Austin freeze.

The design solution in the backyard focused on expanding the idea of the peaceful refuge by installing meandering paths through diverse plantings intended to draw the user into the landscape, highlighting the presence of the large shade tree that is central to the sense of privacy and enclosure of the space, and implementing a large, calming water feature. The stone borders and pathways are comprised of nicotine limestone sawed chop block that beautifully compliment the impressive three-pump water feature.

We also installed a custom key hole garden made from red cedar with built in trellis supports and a nearby slimline rainwater cistern for produce gardening and irrigation.

In the front yard, our focus was an update to the existing landscape to increase curb appeal and provide a sense of connection with the backyard landscape. New bed lines were defined to capture the areas in which lawn would thrive, and native and adapted planting were implemented along the perimeters of the landscape to draw the eye of passersby. A new railing was also added to the front porch to provide better accessibility for the home owners. 

The Cherrywood Charmer is now a beautiful and sustainable landscape that reflects the homeowner's vision and the expertise of Native Edge Landscape.